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It's been a while since I've posted anything on this blog, but let's get some discussion going. Any suggestions?

The "Multilingual Internet"

The Multilingual Internet?

There's a lot of research out there on English-language computer-mediated communication, but relatively little attention has been paid to languages other than English. And even when other languages have been studied, this research isn't always available to an international readership. Danet and Herring's (2008) edited volume (based on a guest-edited issue of the Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication, vol. 9, 1) is a step in the right direction.

In this entry, I hope to provide a few more references for articles dealing with electronic discourse in languages other than English and published in international journals that should be available to most people through institutional subscriptions and/or interlibrary loan. The references I've selected deal mainly with sociolinguistic variation or pragmatics in CMC environments.  If you have any others you'd like to see added, please send me an email.
   
    :: Chinese ::

Yang, C. (2007). Chinese Internet language: A sociolinguistic analysis of adaptations of the Chinese writing system. Language@Internet, 4, Article 2 [np]. Availabe on line: http://www.languageatinternet.de/articles/2007/1142/index_html/

    :: French ::


Lewis, D. (2005). Arguing in English and French asynchronous online discussion. Journal of Pragmatics, 37, 1801-1818.

Marcoccia, M. (2004). On-line polyglogues: Conversation structure and participation framework in internet newsgroups. Journal of Pragmatics, 36, 115-145.

van Compernolle, R. A. (In Press). Second-person pronoun use and address strategies in on-line personal advertisements from Quebec. Journal of Pragmatics. Corrected proof published on line: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pragma.2008.04.008.

van Compernolle, R. A. (In Press, July 2008). Morphosyntactic and phonological constraints on negative particle variation in French-language chat discourse. Language Variation and Change, 20(2).

van Compernolle, R. A. (In Press, September 2008). Nous versus on: Pronouns with first-person plural reference in synchronous French chat. Canadian Journal of Applied Linguistics, 11(2).

van Compernolle, R. A. (2008). Language variation in online personal ads from Quebec: The case of ne. Language@Internet, 5, Article 1 [np]. Available here: http://www.languageatinternet.de/articles/2008/1666/index_html/

Williams, L., & van Compernolle, R. A. (In Press). On versus tu and vous: Pronouns with indefinite reference in synchronous electronic French discourse. Language Sciences. Corrected proof published on line: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.langsci.2007.11.001

Williams, L., & van Compernolle, R. A. (2007). Second-person pronoun use in on-line French-language chat environments. The French Review, 80(4), 804-820.

    :: German ::


Androutsopoulos, J. (2006). Multilinguism, diaspora, and the Internet: Codes and identities on German-based diaspora websites. Journal of Sociolinguistics, 10, 520-547.


Siebenhaar, B. (2006). Code-choice and code-switching in Swiss-German Internet Relay Chat room. Journal of Sociolinguistics, 10, 481-506.

    :: Spanish ::

del-Teso-Craviotto, M. (2006). Language and sexuality in Spanish and English dating chats. Journal of Sociolinguistics, 10, 460-480.

Teen Language and IM

Sali Tagliamonte and Derick Denis have recently published an article dealing with teen language variation in IM language. Although a lot of people have looked at IM, Tagliamonte and Denis actually analyze linguistic variants found in (English-speaking Canadian) teen speech, comparing patterns of variation in IM with those found in interviews with the same people. Here's the reference:

Tagliamonte, S., & Denis, D. (2008). Linguistic ruin? LOL. Instant messaging and teen language. American Speech, 83(1), 3-34.

Happy reading.

RAvC

"Language and Technology" ARAL, Vol. 27

Volume 27 (2007; published 2008) of the Annual Review of Applied Linguistics (Cambridge UP) covers a wide range of issues related to teaching and learning (second or foreign) languages using computer-mediated communication technologies.

Here's the table of contents. Happy reading.

RAvC

AUDIENCE, AUTHORSHIP, AND ARTIFACT: THE EMERGENT SEMIOTICS OF WEB 2.0
Mark Warschauer and Douglas Grimes
pp. 1-23

USING ELECTRONIC PUBLISHING AS A RESOURCE FOR INCREASING EMPIRICAL AND INTERPRETIVE ACCOUNTABILITY IN CONVERSATION ANALYSIS
Numa Markee and Jon Stansell
pp. 24-44
     
THE ROLE OF COMPUTER MEDIATION IN THE INSTRUCTION AND DEVELOPMENT OF L2 PRAGMATIC COMPETENCE
Julie A. Belz
pp. 45-75
     
NEW TRENDS IN USING TECHNOLOGY IN THE LANGUAGE CURRICULUM
Robert J. Blake
pp. 76-97
     
TECHNOLOGY AND SECOND LANGUAGE ACQUISITION
Carol A. Chapelle
pp. 98-114   
     
ASSESSING LANGUAGE USING COMPUTER TECHNOLOGY
Dan Douglas and Volker Hegelheimer
pp. 115-132
     
LANGUAGE AND LITERACY DEVELOPMENT IN COMPUTER-MEDIATED CONTEXTS AND COMMUNITIES
Steven L. Thorne and Rebecca W. Black
pp. 133-160
     
PLAGIARISM AND SECOND LANGUAGE WRITING IN AN ELECTRONIC AGE
John Flowerdew and Yongyan Li
pp. 161-183

COMPUTER TECHNOLOGY IN TEACHING AND RESEARCHING PRONUNCIATION
John Levis
pp. 184-202
     
WHY THE TAIL WAGS THE DOG: THE PERNICIOUS INFLUENCE OF PRODUCT-ORIENTED DISCOURSE ON THE PROVISION OF EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY SUPPORT
James P. Witte
pp. 203-215